FANDOM


Tipitaka >> Vinaya Pitaka >> Khandhaka >> Mahavagga >> Eighth Khandaka >> 8.1

Adapted from the Translation by T. W. Rhys Davids and Hermann Oldenberg


MAHAVAGGA

EIGHTH KHANDHAKA (THE DRESS OF THE BHIKKHUS)

Chapter-1.

1. At that time the Great Buddha dwelt at Rajagaha, in the Veluvana, in the Kalandaka-nivapa. At that time Veshali was an opulent, prosperous town, populous, crowded with people, abundant with food; there were seven thousand seven hundred and seven storeyed buildings, and seven thousand seven hundred and seven pinnacled buildings, and seven thousand seven hundred and seven pleasure grounds (Aramas), and seven thousand seven hundred and seven lotus-ponds. There was also the courtezan Ambapalika, who was beautiful, graceful, pleasant, gifted with the highest beauty of complexion, well versed in dancing, singing, and lute-playing, much visited by desirous people. She asked fifty kahapanas(bronze coins) for one night. Through that person Veshali became more and more flourishing.

2. Now a merchant from Rajagaha went to Veshali on a certain business. That Rajagaha merchant saw what an opulent, prosperous town Veshali was, how populous, crowded with people, and abundant with food, and the seven thousand seven hundred and seven storeyed buildings . . . . and the courtezan Ambapali, who was beautiful . . . . and through whom Veshali became more and more flourishing. And the Rajagaha merchant, after having done his business in Veshali, returned to Rajagaha and went to the place where the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara was. Having approached him, he said to the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara: 'Veshali, Your Majesty, is an opulent, prosperous town (&c., as in §-1, down to:) Through that person Veshali becomes more and more flourishing. May it please Your Majesty, let us also install a courtezan.'

(The king replied), 'Well, my good Sir, look for such a girl whom you can install as courtezan.'

3. Now at that time there was at Rajagaha a girl Salavati by name, who was beautiful, graceful, pleasant, and gifted with the highest beauty of complexion. That girl Salavati the Rajagaha merchant installed as courtezan. And before long the courtezan Salavati was well versed in dancing, singing, and lute-playing, and much visited by desirous people, and she asked one hundred (kahapanas/bronze coins) for one night. And before long the courtezan Salavati became pregnant. Now the courtezan Salavati thought: 'Men do not like a pregnant woman. If anybody should find out regarding me that "The courtezan Salavati is pregnant," my whole position will be lost. What if I were to have the people told that I am sick.'

And the courtezan Salavati gave orders to the door-keeper (saying), 'Let no man enter here, my good door-keeper, and if a man calls for me, tell him that I am sick.' The door-keeper accepted this of the courtezan Salavati (by saying), Yes, Madam.'

4. And the courtezan Salavati, when the child in her womb had reached maturity, gave birth to a boy. And the courtezan Salavati gave orders to her maid-servant (saying), 'Go, my girl, put this boy into an old winnowing basket, take him away, and throw him away on a dust-heap.' The servant accepted this order of the courtezan Salavati (by saying), 'Yes, Madam,' put that boy into an old winnowing basket, took him away, and threw him away on a dust-heap.

At that time a royal prince, Abhaya by name, went early to attend upon the king, and saw that boy, around whom crows were gathering. When he saw that, he asked the people: 'What is that, my good Sirs, around which the crows are gathering?'

It is a boy, Your Highness .'

'Is he alive, Sirs?'

'He is alive, Your Highness.'

'Well, my good Sirs, bring that boy to our palace and give him to the nurses to nourish him.'

And those people accepted that order of the royal prince Abhaya (by saying), 'Yes, Your Highness,' brought that boy to the palace of the royal prince Abhaya, and gave him to the nurses (saying),

'Nourish (this boy).'

Because (the people had said about this boy to Abhaya), 'He is alive' (Jivati), they gave him the name of Jivaka; because he had been caused to be nourished by the royal prince (kumarena posapito), they gave him the name of Komarabhakka.

5. And before long Jivaka Komarabhakka came to the years of discretion. And Jivaka Komarabhakka went to the place where the royal prince Abhaya was; having approached him he said to the royal prince Abhaya: 'Who is my mother, Your Highness, and who is my father?'

'I do not know your mother, my good Jivaka, but I am your father, for I have had you nourished.'

Now Jivaka Komarabhakka thought: 'In these royal families it is not easy to find one's livelihood without knowing an art. What if I were to learn an art.'

6. At that time there lived at Takkasila (Taxila near Islamabad) a world-renowned physician. And Jivaka Komarabhakka without asking leave of the royal prince Abhaya set out for Takkasila. Wandering from place to place he came to Takkasila and to the place where that physician was. Having approached him he said to that physician, 'I wish to learn your art, doctor.

'Well, friend Jivaka, learn it.'

And Jivaka Komarabhakka learnt much, and learnt easily, and understood well, and did not forget what he had learnt. And when seven years had elapsed, Jivaka Komarabhakka thought: 'I learn much, and learn easily, and I understand well, and I do not forget what I have learnt. I have studied now seven years, and I do not see the end of this art. When shall I see the end of this art?'

7. And Jivaka Komarabhakka went to the place where that physician was; having approached him he said to that physician: 'I learn much, doctor, and I learn easily; I understand well, and do not forget what I have learnt. I have studied now seven years, and I do not see the end of this art. When shall I see the end of this art?'

'Very well, my dear Jivaka, take this spade, and seek round about Takkasila a yogana on every side, and whatever (plant) you see which is not medicinal, bring it to me.'

Jivaka Komarabhakka accepted this order of that physician (saying), 'Yes, doctor,' took a spade, and went around about Takkasila a yogana on every side, but he did not see anything that was not medicinal. Then Jivaka Komarabhakka went to the place where that physician was; having approached him he said to that physician: 'I have been seeking, doctor, all around Takkasila a yogana on every side, but I have not seen anything that is not medicinal.'

(The physician replied), 'You have done your learning, my good Jivaka; this will do for acquiring your livelihood.' Speaking thus he gave to Jivaka Komarabhakka a little (money) for his journey (home).

8. And Jivaka Komarabhakka took that little money, given to him for his journey, and set out for Rajagaha. And on the way at Saketa that little money of Jivaka Komarabhakka was spent. Now Jivaka Komarabhakka thought: 'These ways are wild, and there is but little water and little food; it is difficult to travel here without money for the journey. What if I were to try to get some money for my journey.'

At that time the setthi(rich businessman)'s wife at Saketa had been suffering for seven years from disease in the head; many very great and world-renowned physicians came, but they could not restore her to health; they received much gold, and went away.

And Jivaka Komarabhakka, when he had entered Saketa, asked the people: 'Who is sick here, my good Sirs? Whom shall I cure?'

'That setthi's wife, doctor, has been suffering for seven years from a disease in the head; go, doctor, and cure that setthi's wife.'

9. Then Jivaka Komarabhakka went to the house of that householder, the setthi; and when he had reached it, he gave orders to the door-keeper (saying), 'Go, my good door-keeper, and tell the setthi's wife: "A physician has come in, Madam, who wants to see you."'

That door-keeper accepted this order of Jivaka Komarabhakka (saying), 'Yes, doctor,' went to the place where the setthi's wife was, and having approached her, he said to the setthi's wife: 'A physician has come in, Madam, who wants to see you.'

'What sort of man is that physician, my good door-keeper?'

'He is a young man, Madam.'

'Nay, my good door-keeper, what can a young physician help me? Many very great and world-renowned physicians have come and have not been able to restore me to health; they have received much gold, and have gone away.'

10. Thus that door-keeper went to Jivaka Komarabhakka; having approached him he said to Jivaka Komarabhakka: 'The setthi's wife has said, doctor: "Nay, my good door-keeper (&c., as in §-9)."'

(Jivaka replied), 'Go, my good door-keeper, and tell the setthi's wife: "The physician, Madam, says: 'Do not give me anything beforehand, Madam when you shall have been restored to health, then you may give me what you like."'

The door-keeper accepted this order of Jivaka Komarabhakka (saying), 'Yes, doctor,' went to the place where the setthi's wife was, and having approached her he said to the setthi's wife: 'The physician, Madam, says (&c., as above).'

'Well, my good door-keeper, let the physician enter.'

The door-keeper accepted this order of the setthi's wife (saying), 'Yes, Madam,' went to the place where Jivaka Komarabhakka was, and having approached him he said to Jivaka Komarabhakka: 'The setthi's wife calls you, doctor.'

11. Then Jivaka Komarabhakka went to the place where the setthi's wife was; having approached her, and having carefully observed the change in the appearance of the setthi's wife, he said to the setthi's wife: 'We want one pasata of ghee, Madam.' Then the setthi's wife ordered one pasata of ghee to be given to Jivaka Komarabhakka. And Jivaka Komarabhakka boiled up that pasata of ghee(clarified butter) with various drugs, ordered the setthi's wife to lie down on her back in the bed, and gave it her through her nose. And the butter given through the nose came out through the mouth. And the setthi's wife spat it out into the spittoon, and told the maid-servant: 'Come, my girl, take this ghee up with a piece of cotton.'

12. Then Jivaka Komarabhakka thought: 'It is astonishing how niggardly this house-wife is, in that she has this ghee, which ought to be thrown away, taken up with a piece of cotton. I have given her many highly precious drugs. What sort of fee will she give me?'

And the setthi's wife, when she observed the change of demeanour in Jivaka Komarabhakka, said to Jivaka Komarabhakka: 'Why are you perplexed, doctor?'

'I thought: "It is astonishing, &c."'

'Householders like us, doctor, know why to economize thus; this ghee will do for the servants or workmen to anoint their feet with, or, it can be poured into the lamp. Be not perplexed, doctor, you will not lose your fee.'

13. And Jivaka Komarabhakka drove away the disease in the head which the setthi's wife had had for seven years, by once giving her medicine through the nose. Then the setthi's wife, who had been' restored to health, gave four thousand (kahapanas/bronze coins) to Jivaka Komarabhakka; her son (thinking), 'My mother stands there restored,' gave him four thousand; her daughter-in-law (thinking), 'My mother-in-law stands there restored,' gave him four thousand; the setthi, the householder, (thinking), 'My wife stands there restored,' gave him four thousand and a man-servant and a maid-servant and a coach with horses.

Then Jivaka Komarabhakka took those sixteen thousand (kahapanas/bronze coins) and the man-servant, the maid-servant, and the coach with the horses, and set out for Rajagaha. In due course he came to Rajagaha, and to the place where the royal prince Abhaya was; having approached him he said to the royal prince Abhaya: 'This, Your Highness, (have I received for) the first work I have done, sixteen thousand and a man-servant and a maid-servant and a coach with horses; may Your Highness accept this as payment for my bringing up.'

'Nay, my dear Jivaka, keep it, but do not get a dwelling for yourself elsewhere than in our residence.'

Jivaka Komarabhakka accepted this order of the royal prince Abhaya (saying), 'Yes, Your Highness,' and got himself a dwelling in the residence of the royal prince Abhaya.

14. At that time the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara suffered from a fistula; his garments were stained with blood. When the queens saw that,

they ridiculed (the king, and said): 'His Majesty is having his courses. His Majesty will bring forth!' The king was annoyed at that. And the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara said to the royal prince Abhaya: 'I am suffering, my dear Abhaya, from such a disease that my garments are stained with blood; and the queens, when they see it, ridicule (me by saying), "His Majesty is, &c." Pray, my dear Abhaya, find a physician for me, able to cure me.'

'This excellent young physician of ours, Sire, Jivaka, he will cure Your Majesty.'

'Then pray, my dear Abhaya, give orders to the physician Jivaka, and he shall cure me.'

15. Then the royal prince Abhaya gave orders to Jivaka Komarabhakka (saying), 'Go, my dear Jivaka, and cure the king.'

Jivaka Komarabhakka accepted this order of the royal prince Abhaya (by saying), 'Yes, Your Highness,' took some medicament in his nail, and went to the place where the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara was. Having approached him, he said to the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara: 'Let us see your disease, Your Majesty.' And Jivaka Komarabhakka healed the fistula of the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara by one anointing.

Then the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara, having been restored to health, ordered his five hundred wives to put on all their ornaments; then he ordered them to take their ornaments off and to make a heap of them, and he said to Jivaka Komarabhakka: 'All these ornaments, my dear Jivaka, of my five hundred wives shall be your.'

'Nay, Sire, may Your Majesty remember my office.'

'Very well, my dear Jivaka, you can wait upon me and my seraglio and the fraternity of Bhikkhus with the Buddha at its head.'

Jivaka Komarabhakka accepted this order of the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara (by saying), 'Yes, Your Majesty.'

16. At that time the setthi(rich businessman) at Rajagaha had been suffering for seven years from a disease in the head. Many very great and world-renowned physicians came, and were not able to restore him to health; they received much gold and went away. And a prognostication had been made by the physicians to him, to wit: Some of the physicians said: 'The setthi, the householder, will die on the fifth day;' other physicians said: 'The setthi, the householder, will die on the seventh day.'

Now (a certain) Rajagaha merchant thought: 'This setthi, this householder, does good service both to the king and to the merchants' guild. Now the physicians have made prognostication to him(&c., as above). There is Jivaka, the royal physician, an excellent young doctor. What if we were to ask the king for his physician Jivaka to cure the setthi, the householder?'

17. And the Rajagaha merchant went to the place where the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara was; having approached him, he said to the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara: That setthi, Sire, that householder, does good service both to Your Majesty and to the merchants' guild. Now the physicians have made prognostication to him, &c. May it please Your Majesty to order the physician Jivaka to cure the setthi, the householder.'

Then the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara gave

orders to Jivaka Komarabhakka (saying), 'Go, my dear Jivaka, and cure the setthi, the householder.'

Jivaka Komarabhakka accepted this order of the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara (by saying), 'Yes, Your Majesty,' went to the place where the setthi, the householder, was, and having approached him, and having carefully observed the change in his appearance, he said to the setthi, the householder: 'If I restore you to health, my good householder, what fee will you give me?'

'All that I possess shall be yours, doctor, and I will be your slave.'

18. 'Well, my good householder, will you be able to lie down on one side for seven months?'

'I shall be able, doctor, to lie down on one side for seven months.'

'And will you be able, my good householder, to lie down on the other side for seven months?'

'I shall be able, doctor, to lie down on the other side for seven months.'

'And will you be able, my good householder, to lie down on your back for seven months?'

'I shall be able, doctor, to lie down on my back for seven months.'

Then Jivaka Komarabhakka ordered the setthi, the householder, to lie down on his bed, tied him fast to his bed, cut through the skin of the head, drew apart the flesh on each side of the incision, pulled two worms out (of the wound), and showed them to the people (saying), 'See, Sirs, these two worms, a small one and a big one. The doctors who said, "On the fifth day the setthi(rich businessman), the householder, will die," have seen this big worm, and how it would penetrate on the fifth day to the brain of the setthi, the householder, and that when it had penetrated to the brain, the setthi, the householder, would die. Those doctors have seen it quite rightly. And the doctors who said, "On the seventh day the setthi, the householder, will die," have seen this small worm, and how it would penetrate on the seventh day to the brain of the setthi, the householder, and that when it had penetrated to the brain, the setthi, the householder, would die. Those doctors have seen it quite rightly.' (Speaking thus) he closed up the sides of the wound, stitched up the skin on the head, and anointed it with salve.

19. And when seven days had elapsed, the setthi, the householder, said to Jivaka Komarabhakka: 'I am not able, doctor, to lie down on one side for seven months.'

'Did you not tell me, my good householder: "I shall be able, doctor, to lie down on one side for seven months?"'

'It is true, doctor, I told you so indeed, but I shall die (if I do); I cannot lie down on one side for seven months.'

'Well, my good householder, then you must lie down on the other side for seven months.'

And when seven days had elapsed, the setthi, the householder, said to Jivaka Komarabhakka: 'I am not able, doctor, to lie down on the other side for seven months.'

'Did you not tell me, &c.'

It is true, doctor, I told you so indeed, &c.'

'Well, my good householder, then you must lie down on your back for seven months.'

And when seven days had elapsed, the setthi, the householder, said to Jivaka Komarabhakka: 'I am

not able, doctor, to lie down on my back for seven months.'

Did you not tell me, &c.?'

It is true, doctor, I told you so indeed, &c.'

20. 'If I had not spoken thus to you, my good householder, you would not have lain down even so long a time. But I knew beforehand, "After three times seven days the setthi, the householder, will be restored to health." Arise, my good householder, you are restored; look to it what fee you give me.'

'All that I possess shall be yours, doctor, and I will be your slave.'

'Nay, my good householder, do not give me all that you possess, and do not be my slave; give one hundred thousand (kahapanas/bronze coins) to the king, and one hundred thousand to me.'

Then the setthi, the householder, having regained his health, gave a hundred thousand (kahapanas/bronze coins) to the king, and a hundred thousand to Jivaka Komarabhakka.

21. At that time the son of the setthi at Benares, who used to amuse himself by tumbling (mokkhakika), brought upon himself an entanglement of his intestines, in consequence of which he could digest neither the rice-milk which he drank, nor the food of which he partook, nor was he able to ease himself in the regular way. In consequence of that he grew lean, he looked disfigured and discoloured, (his complexion became) more and more yellow, and the veins stood out upon his skin.

Now the setthi of Benares thought: 'My son is suffering from such and such a disease: he neither can digest the rice-milk which he drinks (&c., as above, down to:) and the veins stand out upon his skin. What if I were to go to Rajagaha and to ask the king for his physician Jivaka to cure my son.'

And the setthi of Benares went to Rajagaha and went to the place where the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara was; having approached him he said to the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara: 'My son, Your Majesty, is suffering from such and such a disease: he neither can digest the rice-milk which he drinks (&c., as above, down to:) and the veins stand out upon his skin. May it please Your Majesty to order the physician Jivaka to cure my son.'

22. Then the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara gave orders to Jivaka Komarabhakka (saying), 'Go, my dear Jivaka; go to Benares, and cure the setthi's son at Benares.'

Jivaka Komarabhakka accepted this order of the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara (by saying), 'Yes, Your Majesty,' went to Benares, and went to the place where the son of the Benares setthi was; having approached him, and having carefully observed the change in his appearance, he ordered the people to leave the room, drew the curtain, tied him fast to a pillar, placed his wife in front of him, cut through the skin of the belly, drew the twisted intestines out, and showed them to his wife (saying), 'Look here what the disease was, from which your husband was suffering. This is the reason why he neither can digest the rice-milk which he drinks, nor can digest the food of which he partakes, nor is able to ease himself in the regular way, and why he has grown lean, and looks disfigured and discoloured, and (why his complexion has become) more and more yellow, and the veins have stood out upon his skin.' (Speaking thus), he disentangled the twisted intestines, put the intestines back (into their right position), stitched the skin together, and anointed it with salve. And before long the Benares setthi's son regained his health.

Then the setthi of Benares (saying to himself), 'My son stands here restored to health,' gave sixteen thousand (kahapanas/bronze coins) to Jivaka Komarabhakka. And Jivaka Komarabhakka took those sixteen thousand (kahapanas/bronze coins), and went back again to Rajagaha.

23. At that time king Pajjota (of Ujjeni) was suffering from jaundice. Many very great and world-renowned physicians came and were not able to restore him to health; they received much gold and went away. Then king Pajjota sent a messenger to the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara (with the following message): 'I am suffering from such and such a disease; pray, Your Majesty, give orders to the physician Jivaka; he will cure me.' Then the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara gave orders to Jivaka Komarabhakka (saying), 'Go, my dear Jivaka; go to Ujjeni, and cure king Pajjota.'

Jivaka Komarabhakka accepted this order of the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara (by saying), 'Yes, Your Majesty,' went to Ujjeni and to the place where king Pajjota was, and having approached him, and having carefully observed the change in his appearance, he said to king Pajjota:

24. 'I will boil up some ghee, Sire, which Your Majesty must drink.'

'Nay, my good Jivaka; do what you can for restoring me without giving me ghee(clarified butter); I have an aversion and a distaste for ghee.'

Then Jivaka Komarabhakka thought: 'The disease of this king is such a one that it cannot be cured without ghee. What if I were to boil up ghee so that it takes the colour, the smell, and the taste of an astringent decoction.'

Then Jivaka Komarabhakka boiled some ghee with various drugs so as to give it the colour, the smell, and the taste of an astringent decoction. And Jivaka Komarabhakka thought: 'When this king will shall have taken the butter and digested it, it will make him vomit. This king is cruel; he might have me killed. What if I were to take leave before

hand.' And Jivaka Komarabhakka went to the place where king Pajjota was; having approached him he said to king Pajjota:

25. 'We physicians, Sire, draw out roots and gather medical drugs at such an hour as this. May it please Your Majesty to send the following order to the (royal) stables, and to the gates (of the town): "Let Jivaka ride out on what animal he likes; let him leave (the town) by what gate he likes; let him leave at what hour he likes; let him enter again at what hour he likes."'

And king Pajjota sent the following order to the (royal) stables and to the gates (of the town): 'Let Jivaka ride out on what animal he likes, &c.'

At that time king Pajjota had a she-elephant, called Bhaddavatika, which could travel fifty yoganas (in one day). And Jivaka Komarabhakka gave the ghee to king Pajjota (saying), 'May Your Majesty drink this decoction.' Then, having made king Pajjota drink the ghee, Jivaka Komarabhakka went to the elephant stable, and hasted away from the town on the she-elephant Bhaddavatika.

26. And when king Pajjota had drunk that ghee and was digesting it, it made him vomit. Then king Pajjota said to his attendants: 'That wicked Jivaka, my good Sirs, has given me ghee to drink. Go, my good Sirs, and seek the physician Jivaka.'

(The attendants answered), 'He has run away from the town on the she-elephant Bhaddavatika.'

At that time king Pajjota had a slave, Kaka by name, who could travel sixty yoganas (in one day), who had been begotten by a non-human being. To this slave Kaka; king Pajjota gave the order: 'Go, my good Kaka, and call the physician Jivaka back (saying), "The king orders you to return, doctor." But those physicians, my good Kaka, are cunning people; do not accept anything from him.'

27. And the slave Kaka overtook Jivaka Komarabhakka on his way, at Kosambi, when he was taking his breakfast. And the slave Kaka said to Jivaka Komarabhakka: 'The king orders you to return, doctor.'

(Jivaka replied), 'Wait, my good Kaka, until we have taken our meal; here, my good Kaka, eat.'

(Kaka said), 'Nay, doctor, the king has told me, "Those physicians, my good Kaka, are cunning people; do not accept anything from him."'

At that time Jivaka Komarabhakka, who had cut off some drug with his nail, was eating an emblic myrobalan fruit and drinking water. And Jivaka Komarabhakka said to the slave Kaka: 'Here, my good Kaka, eat of this myrobalan fruit and take some water.'

28. Then the slave Kaka thought: 'This physician eats the myrobalan and drinks the water; there cannot be any harm in it;' so he ate half of the myrobalan and drank some water. And that half myrobalan which (Jivaka) had given him to eat, opened his bowels on the spot.

Then the slave Kaka said to Jivaka Komarabhakka: 'Can my life be saved, doctor?'

(Jivaka replied), 'Be not afraid, my good Kaka, you will be quite well. But the king is cruel; that king might have me killed; therefore do I not return.'

Speaking thus he handed over to Kaka the she-elephant Bhaddavatika and set out for Rajagaha. Having reached Rajagaha in due course, he went to the place where the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara was; having approached him he told the whole thing to the Magadha king Bimbisara.

(Bimbisara said), 'You have done right, my good Jivaka, that you have not returned; that king is cruel; he might have had you killed.'

29. And king Pajjota, being restored to health, sent a messenger to Jivaka Komarabhakka (with this message), 'May Jivaka come to me; I will grant him a boon.'

(Jivaka replied), 'Nay, Sir, may His Majesty remember my office.'

At that time king Pajjota had a suit of Siveyyaka cloth, which was the best, and the most excellent, and the first, and the most precious, and the noblest of many cloths, and of many suits of cloth, and of many hundred suits of cloth, and of many thousand suits of cloth, and of many hundred thousand suits of cloth. And king Pajjota sent this suit of Siveyyaka cloth to Jivaka Komarabhakka. Then Jivaka Komarabhakka thought: 'This suit of Siveyyaka cloth which king Pajjota has sent me, is the best and the most excellent (&c., down to:) and of many hundred thousand suits of cloth. Nobody else is worthy to receive it but He the benevolent, perfect Arahat-Buddha, or the Magadha king Seniya Bimbisara.'

30. At that time a disturbance had befallen the humors of the Lord Buddha's body. And the Lord Buddha said to the venerable Ananda: 'A disturbance, Ananda, has befallen the humors of the Tathagata's body; the Tathagata wishes to take a purgative.' Then the venerable Ananda went to the place where Jivaka Komarabhakka was; having approached him he said to Jivaka Komarabhakka:

'My good Jivaka, a disturbance has befallen the humors of the Tathagata's body; the Tathagata wishes to take a purgative.'

(Jivaka replied), 'Well, venerable Ananda, you ought to rub the Lord Buddha's body with fat for a few days.'

And the venerable Ananda, having rubbed the Lord Buddha's body with fat for some days, went to the place where Jivaka Komarabhakka was; having approached him he said to Jivaka Komarabhakka: 'I have rubbed, my good Jivaka, the Tathagata's body with fat; do you now what you think fit.'

31. Then Jivaka Komarabhakka thought: 'It is not becoming that I should give a strong purgative to the Lord Buddha.' (Thinking thus), he imbued three handfuls of blue lotuses with various drugs and went therewith to the place where the Lord Buddha was; having approached him he offered one handful of lotuses to the Lord Buddha (saying), 'Lord, may the Lord Buddha smell this first handful of lotuses; that will purge the Lord Buddha ten times.' Thus he offered also the second handful of lotuses to the Lord Buddha (saying), 'Lord, may the Lord Buddha smell this second handful of lotuses;

that will purge the Lord Buddha ten times.' Thus he offered also the third handful of lotuses to the Lord Buddha (saying), 'Lord, may the Lord Buddha smell this third handful of lotuses; that will purge the Lord Buddha ten times. Thus the Lord Buddha will have purged full thirty times.' And Jivaka Komarabhakka, having given to the Lord Buddha a purgative for full thirty times, bowed down before the Lord Buddha, and passed round him with his right side towards him, and went away.

32. And Jivaka Komarabhakka, when he was out of doors, thought: 'I have given indeed to the Lord Buddha a purgative for full thirty times, but as the humors of the Tathagatha's body are disturbed, it will not purge the Lord Buddha full thirty times; it will purge the Lord Buddha only twenty-nine times. But the Lord Buddha, having purged, will take a bath; the bath will purge the Lord Buddha once; thus the Lord Buddha will be purged full thirty times.'

And the Lord Buddha, who understood by the power of his mind this reflection of Jivaka Komarabhakka, said to the venerable Ananda: 'Jivaka Komarabhakka, Ananda, when he was out of doors, has thought: "I have given indeed (&c., as above, down to:) thus the Lord Buddha will be purged full thirty times." Well, Ananda, get warm water ready.'

The venerable Ananda accepted this order of the Lord Buddha (saying), 'Yes, Lord,' and got warm water ready.

33. And Jivaka Komarabhakka went to the place where the Lord Buddha was; having approached him and respectfully saluted the Lord Buddha, he sat down near him; sitting near him Jivaka Komarabhakka said to the Lord Buddha: 'Lord, has the Lord Buddha purged?' (Buddha replied), 'I have purged, Jivaka' (Jivaka said), 'When I was out of doors, Lord, I thought: "I have given indeed, &c." Lord, may the Lord Buddha take a bath, may the Happy One take a bath.' Then the Lord Buddha bathed in that warm water; the bath purged the Lord Buddha once; thus the Lord Buddha was purged full thirty times.

And Jivaka Komarabhakka said to the Lord Buddha: 'Lord, until the Lord Buddha's body is completely restored, you had better abstain from liquid food.' And before long the Lord Buddha's body was completely restored.

34. Then Jivaka Komarabhakka took that suit of Siveyyaka cloth and went to the place where the Lord Buddha was; having approached him, and having respectfully saluted the Lord Buddha, he sat down near him. Sitting near him, Jivaka Komarabhakka said to the Lord Buddha: 'Lord, I ask one boon of the Lord Buddha.' (Buddha replied), 'The Tathagatas, Jivaka, are above granting boons (before they know what they are).' (Jivaka said), 'Lord, it is a proper and unobjectionable demand.'--'Speak, Jivaka.'

'Lord, the Lord Buddha wears only pamsukula robes (robes made of rags taken from a dust heap or a cemetery), and so does the fraternity of Bhikkhus(Monks). Now, Lord, this suit of Siveyyaka cloth has been sent to me by king Pajjota, which is the best, and the most excellent, and the first, and the most precious, and the noblest of many cloths and of many suits of cloth, and of many hundred suits of cloth, and of many thousand suits of cloth, and of many hundred thousand suits of cloth. Lord, may the Lord Buddha accept from me this suit of Siveyyaka cloth, and may he allow to the fraternity of Bhikkhus to wear lay robes.'

The Lord Buddha accepted the suit of Siveyyaka cloth. And the Lord Buddha taught, encouraged, animated, and gladdened Jivaka Komarabhakka by dhamma discourse. And Jivaka Komarabhakka, having been taught, encouraged, animated, and gladdened by the Lord Buddha by dhamma discourse, rose from his seat, respectfully saluted the Lord Buddha, passed round him with his right side towards him, and went away.

35. And the Lord Buddha, after having delivered a dhamma discourse in consequence of that, thus addressed the Bhikkhus:

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to wear lay robes. He who likes may wear pamsukula robes; he who likes may accept lay robes. Whether you are pleased with the one or with the other sort of robes, I approve it.'

Now the people at Rajagaha heard, The Lord Buddha has allowed the Bhikkhus to wear lay robes.' Then those people became glad and delighted (because they thought), 'Now we will bestow gifts (on the Bhikkhus) and acquire merit by good works, since the Lord Buddha has allowed the Bhikkhus to wear lay robes.' And in one day many thousands of robes were presented at Rajagaha (to the Bhikkhus).

And the people in the country heard, 'The Lord Buddha has allowed the Bhikkhus to wear lay robes.' Then those people became glad (&c., as above, down to:) And in one day many thousands of robes were presented through the country also (to the Bhikkhus).

36. At that time the Sangha had received a mantle. They told this thing to the Lord Buddha.

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to wear a mantle.'

They had got a silk mantle.

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to wear a silk mantle.'

They had got a fleecy counterpane.

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to use a fleecy counterpane.'

__________________

End of the first Bhanavara.

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.