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Tipitaka » Sutta Pitaka » Khuddaka Nikaya » Dhammapada » Verse 416-I


Dhammapada Verse 416-I - Jatilatthera Vatthu[]


Daw Mya Tin Version[]

Yo'dha tanham pahantvana

anagaro paribbaje

tanhabhavaparikkhinam

tamaham brumi brahmanam.


Verse 416: Him I call a brahmana, who, in this world, has given up craving, and leaving the home-life has become a bhikkhu; who has eradicated craving and has come to the end of existence.



The Story of Thera Jatila

While residing at the Veluvana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse 416-I (1) of this book, with reference to Thera Jatila.

Soon after the passing away (Parinibbana) of Kassapa Buddha, an arahat thera went round for donations to build a gold stupa where the relics of Kassapa Buddha were to be enshrined. The thera came to the house of a goldsmith while he and his wife were engaged in a heated quarrel. The goldsmith shouted at the thera and said, "You had better thrown your stupa into the water and go away." His wife then said to the goldsmith, "If you are angry with me you should abuse me only; you can even beat me if you like; but why do you have to abuse the Buddha and the thera? Surely, you have done a grievous wrong!" Hearing her words, the goldsmith realized the enormity of the wrong he had done and wanted to make atonement for it. So, he made some gold flowers, put them into three gold pots and offered them to be put into the relic chamber of the stupa of Kassapa Buddha.

In his present existence he was conceived in the womb of a rich man's daughter who had had an illicit love affair. When the child was born, she put it into a pot and floated it down the stream. A young woman who was bathing in the stream saw the child in the pot and took it with her. She adopted him and named him Jatila. Later, on the advice of a thera the woman sent Jatila to Taxila where he had his education. While at Taxila the thera arranged for him to stay at the house of a merchant who was a disciple of his. In due course, Jatila married the daughter of the merchant. Soon after the marriage, a large mound of gold appeared in the backyard of the house which was newly built for the couple. Three sons were born out of this marriage. After that, Jatila joined the Order and attained arahatship within a few days.

On one occasion, as the Buddha went on an alms-round with five hundred bhikkhus including Jatila, they came to the house of the sons of Jatila. His sons offered alms-food to the Buddha and his disciples for fifteen days. Some time afterwards, the bhikkhus asked Jatila whether he was still attached to his mound of gold and his sons, and he answered that he had no more attachment to them. The bhikkhus then said to the Buddha that Jatila was falsely claiming to have attained arahatship. To them the Buddha said, "Bhikkhus! Jatila has got rid of craving and pride; he has indeed attained arahatship."

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:


Verse 416: Him I call a brahmana, who, in this world, has given up craving, and leaving the home-life has become a bhikkhu; who has eradicated craving and has come to the end of existence.


(1) Verse 416 have two stories. Read the Story of Thera Jotika next.


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